Project

Sanitary Sewer Master Plan Update
Clean Water Services District, Oregon

West Yost prepared a Sanitary Sewer Master Plan for the District. The project included evaluating the system, expanding and updating the collection system hydraulic model, and ranking problem areas according to severity of surcharging under three development conditions in order to differentiate between near-term and long-term projects.

The District operates four wastewater treatment plants and 39 pump stations, serving 12 member cities and unincorporated areas surrounding Portland, Oregon. The District partners with the cities to build and maintain the public sanitary sewer and surface water management system, primarily in urban Washington County, but including small portions of Portland, Lake Oswego, Multnomah and Clackamas Counties. Six years of land use planning and collection system construction triggered the need for an updated sanitary sewer master plan for the 122 square mile District serving a population of 500,000 near Portland, Oregon. Significant but well-managed growth is expected to eventually increase the population served by as much as 50%, through a combination of urbanization of undeveloped areas, densification, and infill development.

Such growth will result in a need for new sewers and pump stations, wastewater treatment plant expansions, and upsized replacement sewers. West Yost evaluated the system by expanding and updating the collection system hydraulic model. During the course of this work, the model was enhanced to include all new 10-inch and larger sewers, and by adding 23 previously unmodeled pump stations.

The updated master plan ranks problem areas according to severity of surcharging under three development conditions in order to differentiate between near-term and long-term projects. Individual projects are described in an accessible, convenient data sheet format that summarizes all relevant information such as flows at various growth milestones, a map of the pipeline alignments and pump station locations, and identification of any unique project features that will affect costs. The master plan document proves to be a valuable tool useful to District staff during the course of their day-to-day work.

Industry Awards

American Council of Engineering Companies Oregon
2009 Engineering Excellence Honor Award

“Due to the size of our system, the amount of data collected, updated, verified and analyzed was substantial. The results of the updated plan provide a valuable mix and balance of detailed information needed for decision making and graphical presentations summarizing large amounts of information in a format that facilitates big picture assessments. These elements of the master plan are useful in conveying information and concepts to a broad audience.”  

                                            Andrew J. Braun, PE, Principal Engineer
                                            Clean Water Services

 

Commands